Circuitry of the Wolf

Liam. 24. Cannock, near Birmingham. Single. Journalism Graduate, Aspiring Photographer, Future Author.

allahyil3analsohyouniyeh:

priceofliberty:

thefreelioness:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

If this were ever a bad idea, it was probably the worst idea for arguably the most corrupt police force in America. 

via Vice:

What the person running the Twitter account probably failed to realize is that most people’s interactions with the cops fall into a few categories:

1. You are talking to them to get help after you or someone you knew was robbed, beaten, murdered, or sexually assaulted.

2. You are getting arrested. 

3. You are getting beaten by the police.

In category 1, you are probably not going to be like, “Oh, let me take a selfie with you fine officers so I can remember this moment,” and the other two categories are not things that the NYPD would like people on social media talking about. Additionally, the people who use Twitter a lot (and who aren’t Sonic the Hedgehog roleplayers) are the type who love fucking with authority figures. In any case, #myNYPD quickly became a trending topic in the United States, largely because people were tweeting and retweeting horrific images of police brutality perpetrated by New York City cops.

In which the NYPD’s attempt at “public relations” backfires tremendously.

this had me dying of laughter

(via icantthinkofanyrandomurl)

fivehundredrevolutions:

A handy guide to some of the terrible things the Mail has printed since 1924.
This barely scratches the surface, though, I find it hard to believe they didn’t do anything terrible between 1956 and 1984.

fivehundredrevolutions:

A handy guide to some of the terrible things the Mail has printed since 1924.

This barely scratches the surface, though, I find it hard to believe they didn’t do anything terrible between 1956 and 1984.

(via amodernmanifesto)

arielmh:

"We are more than a bit concerned with the Benihana egg trick called for in the script. I’ve tried it and can only get it 1 out of 4 tries, and I’ve seen Benihana chefs flub the manoeuver when they have an entire grill as target. Mads has to crack his eggs into a 8-inch diameter skillet. The props Master calls his guy. The Production Manager calls in his guy. I call my guy. On the morning of the shoot we have 8 dozen eggs and 3 Japanese chefs with their hands made up to be hand doubles. I guess I don’t have to tell you that when Mads arrives on set, he just tosses an egg up in the air and the egg breaks on the spatula. No problem. Unbelievable. I insist it was a lucky fluke but he does it again. I accuse him of practicing when I wasn’t looking but he laughs (as if he has time to practise egg-cracking between scenes) and tells me he was a juggler in his youth.” [x]And here we all thought we’d have a million outtakes of Mads flubbing the egg trick…

arielmh:

"We are more than a bit concerned with the Benihana egg trick called for in the script. I’ve tried it and can only get it 1 out of 4 tries, and I’ve seen Benihana chefs flub the manoeuver when they have an entire grill as target. Mads has to crack his eggs into a 8-inch diameter skillet. The props Master calls his guy. The Production Manager calls in his guy. I call my guy. On the morning of the shoot we have 8 dozen eggs and 3 Japanese chefs with their hands made up to be hand doubles.

 I guess I don’t have to tell you that when Mads arrives on set, he just tosses an egg up in the air and the egg breaks on the spatula. No problem. Unbelievable. I insist it was a lucky fluke but he does it again. I accuse him of practicing when I wasn’t looking but he laughs (as if he has time to practise egg-cracking between scenes) and tells me he was a juggler in his youth.”
[x]

And here we all thought we’d have a million outtakes of Mads flubbing the egg trick…

(via lexiepiper)

2rad5u:

meltingpenguins:

roachpatrol:

elementalsight:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Additionally, Watson’s done good work for a number of years as a sober companion, not a manchild enabler. It’s quite literally her job to deconstruct people’s shitty self-defeating habits and demonstrate that there are better ways to live your life. She’s not in the business of humoring anyone or playing along with their tantrums, she’s in the business of fixing them. And what she does works! It gets spelled out explicitely in the text of the show: Sherlock himself admits that what’s changed about him, for the better, is her. 

Y’know, reading the initial comment, I was reminded on another of the reasons Moffat’s shitfest sucks so much:

Elementary requires active thinking from the audience, BBC’s Sherlock doesn’t. It spells out everything for the audience, even if it makes no sense at all. The audience is lulled in, and blindly believes that any plotdevelopment is logical and sound, because, hell, the characters just said so.

It’s in fact something that’s getting more and more common in today’s fiction, and it’s certainly not a good thing. It’s like explaining a joke and then trying to convince your listeners that the already unfunny joke got even more hilarious now that it was explained.

I sort of worry for humanity as a whole, seeing we do get more and more incapable of thinking about stuff and reading between the lines.

That is, of course, when it comes to actual plot. Hell, people seem to be great with finding clues as to why two characters are gay (even though it’s just effing queerbaiting), but will be totally surprised by a plottwist that was basically spelled out in bright neon letters in the episode summary.

WTH, people.

this is why joan and sherlock are such a good partnership. as sherlock grows he learns to accept her help and you can tell that he really respects joan above many others in his life. like, to the point where his brother wants to know her secret. 

(Source: elementarymydearworld, via stavvers)